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TERMS & CONDITIONS


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  1. Instructions on how to enter, prize details and other information contained within the promotional advertisement form part of these terms and conditions.
  2. This competition commences 13/8/2013 and closes on Friday 27/9/2013.
  3. Entry is open only to residents of Australia.
  4. Only one entry per person.
  5. To enter, entrants must provide a valid email address and complete a survey emailed to them.
  6. The first valid entry randomly drawn on at the end of the promotion will win an Apple Ipod Nano valued at $169 RRP.
  7. The winner will be notified by email by Friday 04/10/2013, and the prize will be delivered by post.
  8. The Cancer Council WA accept no responsibility and shall not be liable for any loss or damage, accident, personal injury or death which is suffered or sustained in connection with this promotion.
  9. Employees and immediate family of the Cancer Council WA and Department of Health WA are ineligible to enter.
  10. Entry into this competition signifies acceptance of all conditions. The Promoters' decision will be final and no correspondence will be entered into. The Promoters reserve the right to limit entry or amend rules if considered necessary without notice.

Implementing Crunch&Sip

fruit

“It comes through in the classroom – discipline wise – the kids are more focused and less likely to be distracted.” - Crunch&Sip Teacher

For teachers new to Crunch&Sip, the logistics of having 30 or more children eating vegetables and fruit in class can be a little bewildering! But Crunch&Sip aims to add to learning, not detract from it. Here is a guide on how to introduce Crunch&Sip into the classroom.

  • Get the message out to students. Talk about what they need to do to participate and distribute Crunch&Sip bookmarks
  • Get the message out to parents. Order or download resources to send home with students, place inserts in the school newsletter or discuss at school meetings. 
  • Set some Crunch&Sip classroom rules. Include these in your start-of-year classroom behaviour discussions.
  • Establish a time for Crunch&Sip each day. The break does not have to be a 'mini-recess' in the classroom.

Apply to become a Crunch&Sip School

Apply to become a Crunch&Sip Classroom

Helpful hints

  • When students arrive in the morning, they can bring in their full water bottle and fruit or veg from their bag for the Crunch&Sip break.  It will soon become part of the morning routine.
  • While all fresh fruit and veg are great choices as recess and lunch items, not all are suitable for a Crunch&Sip break.  Trying to eat a whole orange or mango will get messy.  Encourage students to bring easy to eat, pre-cut vegetables or fruit. If you are concerned about a particular fruit or vegetable being brought in, you can exclude this food in the Crunch&Sip rules for your individual classroom or school.
  • Keep a bucket or bin with a lid outside the classroom door for students to add their fruit and veg scraps, then transfer to the school compost bin or worm farm at the end of the school day.
  • Some ideas for scheduling Crunch&Sip into the day:
    • Have the Crunch&Sip break during lesson transition times, for example, as students come into the class from morning fitness, or between literacy and numeracy lessons.
    • Use news time, story read alouds or silent reading.
    • Have a set time for a Crunch&Sip break every day.  Some schools allow students 5-10 minutes to use the toilet, stretch and eat their fruit or veg.
  • We strongly discourage students grazing on fruit and vegetables throughout the day. Not only can this promote unhealthy snacking habits, but many teachers report that it is more disruptive. Kids may choose inappropriate times to eat their fruit and veg and it can mean that more kids do not participate as it is not seen as compulsory. Other students may eat excessive amounts because they see it as a way of avoiding work.

NEXT: Classroom rules